because summertime in the Chi is the best time
loki-has-a-tardis:

This is honestly the best poster I have found in a while supporting breast cancer awareness. I am honestly so sick of seeing, “set the tatas free” and “save the boobies”. There is no reason in hell a life threatening, life ruining disease should be sexualized. “Don’t wear a bra day,” go fuck yourselves. You’re not saving a pair of tits, you’re saving the entire package: mind, body, and soul included. Women are not just a pair of breasts.

loki-has-a-tardis:

This is honestly the best poster I have found in a while supporting breast cancer awareness. I am honestly so sick of seeing, “set the tatas free” and “save the boobies”. There is no reason in hell a life threatening, life ruining disease should be sexualized. “Don’t wear a bra day,” go fuck yourselves. You’re not saving a pair of tits, you’re saving the entire package: mind, body, and soul included. Women are not just a pair of breasts.

avenue-adventure:

friendlydad:

have you ever just assumed that a word was pronounced a certain way and you end up pronouncing it incorrectly throughout your entire life and then one day someone corrects you and its like you can almost hear satan laughing as the flames of hell begin to seep up from underground and slowly burn you to death

veganfoody:

Sweet Potato and Kale Salad
Every day you get to sleep, study, or have a social life, but you can never do more than one thing per day.

Words of warning from a local surgeon to med students RE: surgery residency. 

(via wayfaringmd)

definitelyjennifer:

imnotthatkindofgirl:

mrsfallontimberlake:

People talk about how hard long distance relationships are but nobody talks about the struggle of long distance friendships. I would give my left leg right now to just be able to sit in our pjs and watch movies or to just be able to give a big fucking hug. 

Long distance is hard with any type of love. I feel this so much.

THIS.

canttuchthis:

i made this chicken and dumplings from budget bytes last night and it was delicious! i did make a couple modifications, which i think were good for the flavor and amount of time i had:
i did this on the stove, not in my slow cooker, and it worked great and took under an hour
i sauteed the onion and garlic in the pot before adding the remaining ingredients
used half water and half chicken stock
rosemary in place of thyme
used rotisserie chicken (to add flavor and expedite cooking time)
given how much work spouse and i both liked it and how crazy easy it was, i’ll definitely be making it again as the weather gets colder.

canttuchthis:

i made this chicken and dumplings from budget bytes last night and it was delicious! i did make a couple modifications, which i think were good for the flavor and amount of time i had:

  • i did this on the stove, not in my slow cooker, and it worked great and took under an hour
  • i sauteed the onion and garlic in the pot before adding the remaining ingredients
  • used half water and half chicken stock
  • rosemary in place of thyme
  • used rotisserie chicken (to add flavor and expedite cooking time)

given how much work spouse and i both liked it and how crazy easy it was, i’ll definitely be making it again as the weather gets colder.

jaclynday:

Command and Control by Eric Schlosser - If you want a scary bedtime story, here you go. This book is phenomenal. It’s quite long—be forewarned if you aren’t looking to be reading the same book for a while—but it’s entirely worth your time. Schlosser digs deep into the development, maintenance, use, and misuse of nuclear weaponry in the US, with the 1980 explosion of a Titan II missile in Searcy, AR as the center point for the book. The near misses Schlosser digs up are truly frightening and it seems a miracle that we haven’t had an accidental nuclear explosion somewhere in this country yet. It’s an exhaustive look at a topic that most people know only fragments of and I found it fascinating and frightening. It’s hard to imagine the scale of devastation that modern nuclear and especially thermonuclear warheads could level—which is why Schlosser gave care to accurately describe what those events could look like and puts that in the context of the modern-day, worldwide nuclear arsenal. This was great nonfiction—one of my favorite so far this year.  
Brutal Youth by Anthony Breznican - If you like your fiction on the dark side and set inside a private school environment, here you go. The book opens with the freshmen at Saint Michael’s Catholic High School preparing for the onslaught of the traditional senior vs. freshmen initiation rites (which are disturbing and are actually bullying, but the nuns turn a blind eye). We follow Peter Davidek through this dog eat dog social environment and we see his fellow students make bargains with the seniors for perceived special treatment or they simply try to disappear and go unnoticed. There’s a corrupt priest, a kid who flings jars of dissection specimens at other students when he snaps, and a nun trying her best to think of slang synonyms for “penis” as she goes to mimic high school graffiti on the wall (she settles on cock, FYI). So yes, I recommend it. 
Dirty Work by Gabriel Weston - Dirty Work is an interesting book. It’s short but there is a lot going on. Weston, a doctor, writes about a fictional London-based OB-GYN (Nancy) who is undergoing several crises at once. Nancy has nearly just killed a patient in surgery and is sitting before a group of medical professionals to determine if she’s fit to practice. Nancy, as it turns out, botched an abortion she was performing. There is very little political to be found here. It’s not so much a debate about abortion or abortion providers. This is more about Nancy’s psychology. She questions her mistakes and begins to lose her sense of self—entirely based on her ability to provide compassionate, meaningful care. What is she if she cannot do that? In the end, I thought this book tackled a very important (and controversial) topic in a nuanced, self-aware way. 
Working Stiff by Judy Melinek, M.D. and T.J. Mitchell - I loved this book. Well, first—a warning. If you’re squeamish, do not read this. I really mean it. Move along. If you’re not (or too curious to remember you are actually squeamish), then you should read it. Melinek and her husband co-wrote it (“hey honey, let’s write about the time I sawed the guy…”)—and the book is about her rookie year as an NYC medical examiner. Melinek has a blunt, objective story-telling style and it grabbed me right from the first page. She maintains her professional demeanor throughout, but still wrote a colorful, interesting book about exactly what a medical examiner does, how they do it, and why it is important. She is not without a sense of humor and occasionally I can see her rubbing her hands together like, yes! Let’s explain how we crack open the skulls! At one point she mentions that everyone at dinner parties always insists she tell them her “worst case” and she always demurs. “Guys, you don’t want to know. Trust me.” But she writes about it in this book. It is really, really horrible. Later, about a quarter from the end of the book, Melinek switches gears and gives the reader a look from inside the NYC Medical Examiner’s office during and post-9/11. It is a memoir worth reading for a lot of reasons, but especially for the bravery, hard work and compassion that Melinek and her colleagues exhibited during that time. 
Read any of these?

To read later

jaclynday:

  • Command and Control by Eric Schlosser - If you want a scary bedtime story, here you go. This book is phenomenal. It’s quite long—be forewarned if you aren’t looking to be reading the same book for a while—but it’s entirely worth your time. Schlosser digs deep into the development, maintenance, use, and misuse of nuclear weaponry in the US, with the 1980 explosion of a Titan II missile in Searcy, AR as the center point for the book. The near misses Schlosser digs up are truly frightening and it seems a miracle that we haven’t had an accidental nuclear explosion somewhere in this country yet. It’s an exhaustive look at a topic that most people know only fragments of and I found it fascinating and frightening. It’s hard to imagine the scale of devastation that modern nuclear and especially thermonuclear warheads could level—which is why Schlosser gave care to accurately describe what those events could look like and puts that in the context of the modern-day, worldwide nuclear arsenal. This was great nonfiction—one of my favorite so far this year.  
  • Brutal Youth by Anthony Breznican - If you like your fiction on the dark side and set inside a private school environment, here you go. The book opens with the freshmen at Saint Michael’s Catholic High School preparing for the onslaught of the traditional senior vs. freshmen initiation rites (which are disturbing and are actually bullying, but the nuns turn a blind eye). We follow Peter Davidek through this dog eat dog social environment and we see his fellow students make bargains with the seniors for perceived special treatment or they simply try to disappear and go unnoticed. There’s a corrupt priest, a kid who flings jars of dissection specimens at other students when he snaps, and a nun trying her best to think of slang synonyms for “penis” as she goes to mimic high school graffiti on the wall (she settles on cock, FYI). So yes, I recommend it. 
  • Dirty Work by Gabriel Weston - Dirty Work is an interesting book. It’s short but there is a lot going on. Weston, a doctor, writes about a fictional London-based OB-GYN (Nancy) who is undergoing several crises at once. Nancy has nearly just killed a patient in surgery and is sitting before a group of medical professionals to determine if she’s fit to practice. Nancy, as it turns out, botched an abortion she was performing. There is very little political to be found here. It’s not so much a debate about abortion or abortion providers. This is more about Nancy’s psychology. She questions her mistakes and begins to lose her sense of self—entirely based on her ability to provide compassionate, meaningful care. What is she if she cannot do that? In the end, I thought this book tackled a very important (and controversial) topic in a nuanced, self-aware way. 
  • Working Stiff by Judy Melinek, M.D. and T.J. Mitchell - I loved this book. Well, first—a warning. If you’re squeamish, do not read this. I really mean it. Move along. If you’re not (or too curious to remember you are actually squeamish), then you should read it. Melinek and her husband co-wrote it (“hey honey, let’s write about the time I sawed the guy…”)—and the book is about her rookie year as an NYC medical examiner. Melinek has a blunt, objective story-telling style and it grabbed me right from the first page. She maintains her professional demeanor throughout, but still wrote a colorful, interesting book about exactly what a medical examiner does, how they do it, and why it is important. She is not without a sense of humor and occasionally I can see her rubbing her hands together like, yes! Let’s explain how we crack open the skulls! At one point she mentions that everyone at dinner parties always insists she tell them her “worst case” and she always demurs. “Guys, you don’t want to know. Trust me.” But she writes about it in this book. It is really, really horrible. Later, about a quarter from the end of the book, Melinek switches gears and gives the reader a look from inside the NYC Medical Examiner’s office during and post-9/11. It is a memoir worth reading for a lot of reasons, but especially for the bravery, hard work and compassion that Melinek and her colleagues exhibited during that time. 

Read any of these?

To read later

You have to be kind of intentional about friendships as you get older, because people drift apart so easily with their own lives or families or just physical distance. The friendships you want to maintain, you really have to protect—not just by commenting on their Twitter feed but by actually, like, inviting them over.
Carrie Brownstein (x)

nevver:

Window seat, Jim Darling